OXIDANT | ENGINE : Masthead

The Team

Brandon Rushton is the winner of the 2016 Gulf Coast Poetry Prize and the 2016 Ninth Letter Literary Award in Poetry. His poems have appeared or are forthcoming in Hayden’s Ferry Review, The Journal, CutBank, Sonora Review, and Passages North. Born and raised in Michigan, he now lives in Charleston, South Carolina and teaches writing at the College of Charleston. With Josh English, he co-founded Oxidant | Engine.
Originally from New Jersey, Josh English spent the first part of his adult life as a songwriter and performer, driving around the country selling self-pressed CD's out of the trunk of his car.  He received his MFA from the University of South Carolina in Columbia, SC where he continues to live and teach.  His work has appeared or is forthcoming in Cutbank, Denver Quarterly, Phantom, Sixth Finch, Third Coast and elsewhere.  He co-founded Oxidant|Engine with Brandon Rushton.
Caylin Capra-Thomas's second chapbook, Inside My Electric City, will be published by YesYes Books in fall of 2016. Her poems have appeared or will soon in journals including Crazyhorse, Willow Springs, Ninth Letter, The Journal, Salt Hill, and elsewhere. Her nonfiction won Yemassee's 2016 Nonfiction Prize. She lives in Gainesville, Florida.
Peter Twal is an electrical engineer living in Lafayette, IN. His works have appeared or will soon in Kenyon Review Online, Ninth Letter Online, Public Pool, Quarterly West, cream city review, The Journal, Devil’s Lake, RHINO, Booth, Yemassee, New Delta Review, Forklift, Ohio, DIAGRAM, Bat City Review, New Orleans Review, and elsewhere. Peter earned his MFA from the University of Notre Dame where he was awarded the Samuel and Mary Anne Hazo Poetry Award. Read more at petertwal.com, should you feel so inclined.

Past Team Members

Amanda Mitchell is a recent graduate of the MFA program at the University of South Carolina, prior to which she studied English and Creative Writing at Hollins University. Her work is forthcoming in Third Coast and Bone Bouquet, and has appeared in Tupelo Quarterly and OSU’s The Journal.